Frequently Asked Questions

How does the district use surplus funds?

The District sells bonds to fund water, sewer, and drainage improvements to serve land within the District. Prior to the sale of District bonds, the Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission (TNRCC) must review plans and specifications for the projects to be funded from bond proceeds and must approve the District's sale of bonds for such specific purposes.
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What to do if you have sprung a leak?

First, determine if it's your line which is leaking. This is very simple. Each home and business in the District has a meter. The meter is typically located near the street on one side of the lot. All of the meters are also inside a meter box, which is typically constructed of black plastic. The cover for the meter box will lift off with just slight effort.
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What exactly is a water district?

The simple answer to that question is that it is a local political subdivision of the State, governed by a board of directors. Also known as MUDs - Municipal Utility Districts - they are authorized under the Texas Constitution, Article III, Section 52, or Article XVI, Section 59.
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What is Stormwater Runoff?

Stormwater runoff occurs when precipitation from rain or snowmelt flows over the ground. Impervious surfaces like driveways, sidewalks, and streets prevent stormwater runoff from naturally soaking into the ground.


Why is stormwater runoff a problem?

Stormwater can pick up debris, chemicals, dirt, and other pollutants and flow into a storm sewer system or directly to a lake, stream, river, wetland, or coastal water. Anything that enters a storm sewer system is discharged untreated into the waterbodies we use for swimming, fishing and providing drinking water.


Are There Water Wasters At Your House?

The key to efficient use of any of our natural resources is old-fashioned common sense. Instead of taking our water supplies for granted, think about how much water your family uses every day, and actively look for ways to use it more efficiently. That means fixing leaky faucets as well as taking shorter showers!
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Q & A Water Conservation & Quality

Although we have had some good rain showers recently, we are not out of the woods yet -- DROUGHT CONDITIONS ARE STILL IN EFFECT. Please continue your efforts to conserve water. The District appreciates everyone's cooperation in preserving our water supplies. Also, don't forget that as you increase your water usage (filling swimming pools, sprinklers, etc.) your water bill increases correspondingly...
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Why Conserve Water?

In Texas, our conventional fresh-water supplies are already 75 to 80 percent developed. That's why the more efficient use of our precious water resources through water conservation and reuse makes economic sense, both to preserve and extend limited water supplies and to save Texans real money.
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